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Marion Cotillard GIF Hunt

This was submitted by a former member of ours. 138 gifs of Marion Cotillard are available here. None of these are mine. Reblog or like this post if you find it useful!

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4 notes      31.07.14

Neutral / Negative Emilia Clarke (Brunette) GIF Hunt

This is my own personal collection of neutral/negative Emilia Clarke gifs. There are about 60+ gifs. Most of them are not in gif hunts so I figured why not share? Some of them are mine and some are not. Feel free to use them! Like or reblog this post if you find this useful.

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28 notes      31.07.14
Emilia Clarke     Emilia Clarke Gif Hunt     Emilia Clarke gifs     game of thrones     roleplay     

♥ NEGATIVE DYLAN O’BRIEN GIF HUNT ♥

larryhunts:

Under the cut are ### HQ GIFs of NEGATIVE DYLAN O'BRIEN ranging in size from small to medium. No GIFs were made by me, all credit goes to the original owners, and I apologize for any repeats. Please like/reblog if you found this helpful.

image

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via      256 notes      23.07.14
gif hunt     dylan o'brien     

Stop using the word “Walk”. We don’t want that word to die together with “Said”.

jadeofrps:

Here are a few words you can replace walk with.

  1. AMBLE: WALK EASILY AND/OR AIMLESSLY
  2. BOUNCE: WALK ENERGETICALLY
  3. CAREEN: PITCH DANGEROUSLY TO ONE SIDE WHILE WALKING OR RUNNING
  4. CLUMP: WALK HEAVILY AND/OR CLUMSILY
  5. FALTER: WALK UNSTEADILY
  6. FLOUNDER: WALK WITH GREAT DIFFICULTY
  7. FOOT IT: (SLANG) DEPART OR SET OFF BY WALKING
  8. FOOTSLOG: WALK HEAVILY AND FIRMLY, AS WHEN WEARY, OR THROUGH MUD
  9. GIMP: LIMP; HOBBLE
  10. HIKE: TAKE A LONG WALK, ESPECIALLY IN A PARK OR A WILDERNESS AREA
  11. HOBBLE: WALK UNSTEADILY OR WITH DIFFICULTY; SEE ALSO LIMP
  12. HOOF IT: (SLANG) WALK; SEE FOOT IT
  13. LEG IT: (SLANG) SEE FOOT IT
  14. LIMP: WALK UNSTEADILY BECAUSE OF INJURY, ESPECIALLY FAVORING ONE LEG; SEE ALSO FALTER
  15. LUMBER: WALK SLOWLY AND HEAVILY
  16. LURCH: WALK SLOWLY BUT WITH SUDDEN MOVEMENTS, OR FURTIVELY
  17. MARCH: WALK RHYTHMICALLY ALONE OR IN A GROUP, ESPECIALLY ACCORDING TO A SPECIFIED PROCEDURE
  18. MEANDER: WALK OR MOVE AIMLESSLY AND IDLY WITHOUT FIXED DIRECTION
  19. MINCE: WALK DELICATELY
  20. MOSEY: SEE AMBLE; ALSO, USED COLLOQUIALLY IN THE PHRASE “MOSEY ALONG”
  21. NIP: WALK BRISKLY OR LIGHTLY; ALSO USED COLLOQUIALLY IN THE PHRASE “NIP (ON) OVER” TO REFER TO A BRIEF WALK TO A CERTAIN DESTINATION, AS IF ON AN ERRAND
  22. PACE: WALK PRECISELY TO MARK OFF A DISTANCE, OR WALK INTENTLY OR NERVOUSLY, ESPECIALLY BACK AND FORTH
  23. PAD: WALK WITH STEADY STEPS MAKING A SOFT DULL SOUND
  24. PARADE: WALK OSTENTATIOUSLY, AS IF TO SHOW OFF
  25. PERAMBULATE: SEE STROLL; TRAVEL ON FOOT, OR WALK TO INSPECT OR MEASURE A BOUNDARY
  26. PEREGRINATE: WALK, ESPECIALLY TO TRAVEL
  27. PLOD: WALK SLOWLY AND HEAVILY, AS IF RELUCTANT OR WEARY
  28. POUND: WALK OR GO WITH HEAVY STEPS; MOVE ALONG WITH FORCE OR VIGOR; SEE LUMBER
  29. POWER WALK: WALK BRISKLY FOR FITNESS
  30. PRANCE: WALK JOYFULLY, AS IF DANCING OR SKIPPING
  31. PROMENADEGO ON A LEISURELY WALK, ESPECIALLY IN A PUBLIC PLACE AS A SOCIAL ACTIVITY; SEEPARADE
  32. PROWL: WALK NOISELESSLY AND CAREFULLY IN A PREDATORY MANNER
  33. PUSSYFOOT: WALK STEALTHILY OR WARILY
  34. RAMBLE: WALK OR TRAVEL AIMLESSLY
  35. ROAMGO WITHOUT FIXED DIRECTION AND WITHOUT ANY PARTICULAR DESTINATION, OFTEN FOR PLEASURE; SEE RAMBLE
  36. ROVE: TRAVEL CONSTANTLY OVER A RELATIVELY LENGTHY TIME PERIOD WITHOUT A FIXED DESTINATION; WANDER
  37. SASHAY: GLIDE, MOVE, OR PROCEED EASILY OR NONCHALANTLY; SEE PARADE
  38. SAUNTER: WALK ABOUT EASILY
  39. SCUFF: WALK WITHOUT LIFTING ONE’S FEET
  40. SHAMBLE: WALK OR GO AWKWARDLY; SHUFFLE; SEE SCUFF
  41. SHUFFLE: WALK WITHOUT LIFTING THE FEET OR WITH CLUMSY STEPS AND A SHAMBLING GAIT; SEESCUFF
  42. SKULK: MOVE IN A STEALTHY OR FURTIVE MANNER
  43. SOMNAMBULATE: WALK IN ONE’S SLEEP
  44. STAGGER: WALK UNSTEADILY
  45. STALK: WALK STEALTHILY, AS IN PURSUIT
  46. STEP: WALK, OR PLACE ONE’S FOOT OR FEET IN A NEW POSITION
  47. STOMP: WALK HEAVILY, AS IF IN ANGER
  48. STRIDE: WALK PURPOSEFULLY, WITH LONG STEPS
  49. STROLL: WALK IN A LEISURELY WAY; SEE SAUNTER
  50. STRUT: WALK WITH A STIFF, ERECT, AND APPARENTLY ARROGANT OR CONCEITED GAIT; SEE PARADE
  51. STUMBLE: WALK CLUMSILY OR UNSTEADILY, OR TRIP
  52. STUMP: WALK HEAVILY, AS WITH A LIMP; SEE LUMBER
  53. SWAGGER: WALK WITH AGGRESSIVE SELF-CONFIDENCE
  54. TIPTOE: WALK CAREFULLY ON THE TOES OR ON THE BALLS OF THE FOOT, AS IF IN STEALTH
  55. TODDLE: MOVE WITH SHORT, UNSTEADY STEPS, AS A YOUNG CHILD; SEE SAUNTER AND STAGGER
  56. TOTTER: WALK OR GO WITH FALTERING STEPS, AS IF FROM EXTREME WEAKNESS; SEE STAGGER(ALSO, SWAY OR BECOME UNSTABLE)
  57. TRAIPSE: WALK LIGHTLY AND/OR AIMLESSLY
  58. TRAMP: WALK HEAVILY OR NOISILY; SEE LUMBER AND HIKE
  59. TRAMPLE: WALK SO AS TO CRUSH SOMETHING UNDERFOOT
  60. TRAVERSE: WALK ACROSS OR OVER A DISTANCE
  61. TREAD: WALK SLOWLY AND STEADILY
  62. TRIP: WALK LIGHTLY; SEE ALSO STUMBLE
  63. TROMP: TREAD HEAVILY, ESPECIALLY TO CRUSH UNDERFOOT; SEE LUMBER
  64. TROOP: WALK IN UNISON, OR COLLECTIVELY
  65. TROT: PROCEED AT A PACE FASTER THAN A WALK; SEE NIP
  66. TRUDGE: WALK SLOWLY AND WITH HEAVY STEPS, TYPICALLY BECAUSE OF EXHAUSTION OR HARSH CONDITIONS; SEE PLOD
  67. WADDLE: WALK CLUMSILY OR AS IF BURDENED, SWINGING THE BODY
  68. WADE: WALK THROUGH WATER OR WITH DIFFICULTY, AS IF IMPEDED
  69. WANDERTO MOVE FROM PLACE TO PLACE WITHOUT A FIXED ROUTE; SEE RAMBLE

RESOURCES: (X) (X) (X) (X) (X)

via     source      2,831 notes      11.07.14

Want Real Information About Psychiatric Drugs? Visit CrazyMeds

nomorepuzzleprofits:

Welcome to Crazymeds, where you can learn what’s good, what’s bad, what’s interesting, and what’s plain weird and funny about the medications used to treat depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, epilepsy, migraines, anxiety, neuropathic pain, or whatever psychiatric and/or neurological condition you might have. The information on this site is to help you work with your doctor(s) to find the right treatment options. Too many of us get nothing more than 15-minute appointments with overworked doctors or nurse-practitioners, so we need all the help we can get. We need to talk to our prescribers about the best medication1 to treat our conditions, and not the most profitable ones, or the cheapest ones2.

OK, in reality “best” usually translates to “least bad.” If you know the name of the medication(s) you’re looking for, you’ll probably want our list of drugs by names and class/category. There’s also our much larger list of all the meds we know about to treat various conditions, including all the brand/trade names we can find for every med in every country in which each is available. We also have the drugs sorted into broad categories with lots of overlapping memberships:

Crazymeds is the site for the obsessed and depressed, the manic and the panicked, the schizophrenic and epileptic, the migraineurs and bipolar, those with GAD, SAD, OCD, PTSD, in pain or have an otherwise non-standard brain4. If you have any specific questions about a drug that wasn’t answered on its page, couldn’t find the drug you’re interested in, or want some help in figuring out which medication is the right one for you, then visit Crazy Talk: Our forum for the mentally interesting. We aren’t doctors or anything, and we don’t diagnose, but we have more experience than we ever wanted when it comes to brain cooties and the crazy meds used to treat them. We’re all about helping each other know what the drugs can and cannot do, what they are likely to do for us and to us, and work with our doctors to make the best, or least bad, choice in medication(s) as quickly as possible.

For real, CrazyMeds is one of the most helpful plain-english information sites regarding psychiatric / neurological drugs and what exactly they DO to your brain. If you’ve ever felt like a human lab experiment just being handed one prescription after another, CrazyMeds can help you understand what effects the drugs have and how they work. The site also discusses realistic side-effects such as the ever-present “head zaps” of SSRIs and others that doctors keep saying we make up for attention.

Also it’s fun to read if you’re a writer and just want to learn about drugs with long names and what they do.

via      4,596 notes      09.07.14
resources     psychiatric drugs     tw:drugs     
Anonymous said: I know you're not a RPH but I have been stalking your rp blogs and your writing amazing! Do you have any advice on para writing? I'm quite new and I'd want to be able to write a good one. Thank you so much!

thegirlwhodidntliveuptohername:

Oh wow! Thank you so much for your kind compliments! I’m not sure if I am the best person you should be asking this since I have only been roleplaying on tumblr for a year and a half. I’m not the best writer out here on Tumblr but I will try my best!
Writing a para with a rp partner is by far one of the most satisfying kind of writing for me. Collaborative writing takes more work and thought. It promotes character development and best of all, when you get an amazing writing partner, they force you to become better and be more mindful of your own writing. The finished / completed product should and would give you personal gratification.
For para writing, of course there are a few mandatory things you need consider, namely,
  • Setting
  • General plot you and your partner(s) have agreed upon
  • A gist of what to expect as you continue writing
These 3 elements must be present before you start writing a para.
When you start writing a starter or a subsequent reply, make sure you have written with enough substance so that your partner could respond properly. My biggest pet peeve is when I have written a good three para starter and I get a one para reply. It’s rather rude unless your partner has told you that length doesn’t matter. Having said that, it is also annoying if the para reply is one sided and a word vomit of unnecessary things.
A paragraph shouldn’t consist of only dialogue. Never. It just goes to show your skill as a writer and no one wants to read the long monologue your character has spouted out.
Instead, tell us how your character feel when they say those words, what prompted them to say so etc. Include pauses in their conversation, stuttering or hesitation if there are any.
Tell us how they had conveyed their spoken words (steadily, in a rambling manner etc). Tell us their feelings or personal principles / beliefs they hold dear while going through the situation you have out them in. This can be conveyed without having your character saying it out loud. Give us more of an in depth feel of your character — their thought process etc.
The body language of your character also conveys so many hidden meanings - if they fiddle with something, that means they’re nervous. If they jut out their chins when they speak, it tells us they’re defiant. Mostly, watch good drama series and pick out those actors you think are convincing and observe what the little things they do to give their character life. Include those actions into your writing of your character. It should be able to give us a 3 dimensional look at your character. 
Most importantly you should be able to move the para forward than to just be stuck in the same position and to only have exchanged a few lines with one another. 
I hope this helps anon! 

I got this ask today and I kinda vomited what I think that could be helpful. Anyway, this is not the best guide of course but I think I have pointed out a few things that can improve the writing in the group! 

via      6 notes      27.06.14
resources     writing tips     
nerdsinmypants:

Stages of Deterioration in the Human Body
The Moment Of Death: 1. The heart stops. 2. The skin gets tight and ashen in color. 3. All the muscles relax. 4. The bladder and bowels empty.  5. The body temperature begins to drop 1 1/2 degrees Fahrenheit per hour. After 30 minutes: 6. The skin gets purple and waxy. 7. The lips, fingernails, and toenails fade to a pale color. 8. Blood pools at the bottom of the body. 9. The hands and feet turn blue. 10. The eyes sink into the skull. After 4 hours: 11. Rigor mortis has set in. 12. The purpling of the skin and the pooling of the blood continue. 13. Rigor continues to tighten muscles for another 24 hours or so. After 12 hours: 14. The body is in full rigor mortis. After 24 hours: 15. The body is now the temperature of the surrounding environment. 16. In males, the semen dies. 17. The head and neck are now a greenish-blue color. 18. The greenish-blue color spreads to the rest of the body. 19. There is a pervasive smell of rotting meat. After 3 days: 20. The gas in the body tissues forms large blisters on the skin. 21. The whole body begins to bloat and swell grotesquely. 22. Fluids leak from the mouth, nose, vagina, and rectum. After 3 weeks: 23. The skin, hair, and nails are so loose they can easily be pulled off the corpse. 24. The skin bursts open on many places on the body. 25. Decomposition will continue until the body is nothing but skelital remains, a process that can take a month or so in hot climates, and two months or more in cold climates.

This is actually pretty interesting.
Important for writers…helps avoid either walking in and knowing someone died moments ago “from the smell” (unless that smell is piss and shit), or finding someone dead for a week that “looks like they’re sleeping.”

nerdsinmypants:

Stages of Deterioration in the Human Body


The Moment Of Death:
1. The heart stops.
2. The skin gets tight and ashen in color.
3. All the muscles relax.
4. The bladder and bowels empty. 
5. The body temperature begins to drop 1 1/2 degrees Fahrenheit per hour.

After 30 minutes:
6. The skin gets purple and waxy.
7. The lips, fingernails, and toenails fade to a pale color.
8. Blood pools at the bottom of the body.
9. The hands and feet turn blue.
10. The eyes sink into the skull.

After 4 hours:
11. Rigor mortis has set in.
12. The purpling of the skin and the pooling of the blood continue.
13. Rigor continues to tighten muscles for another 24 hours or so.

After 12 hours:
14. The body is in full rigor mortis.

After 24 hours:
15. The body is now the temperature of the surrounding environment.
16. In males, the semen dies.
17. The head and neck are now a greenish-blue color.
18. The greenish-blue color spreads to the rest of the body.
19. There is a pervasive smell of rotting meat.

After 3 days:
20. The gas in the body tissues forms large blisters on the skin.
21. The whole body begins to bloat and swell grotesquely.
22. Fluids leak from the mouth, nose, vagina, and rectum.

After 3 weeks:
23. The skin, hair, and nails are so loose they can easily be pulled off the corpse.
24. The skin bursts open on many places on the body.
25. Decomposition will continue until the body is nothing but skelital remains, a process that can take a month or so in hot climates, and two months or more in cold climates.

This is actually pretty interesting.

Important for writers…helps avoid either walking in and knowing someone died moments ago “from the smell” (unless that smell is piss and shit), or finding someone dead for a week that “looks like they’re sleeping.”

via      316,810 notes      15.06.14
resources     

Description: Symptoms of Blood Loss

How to describe blood loss at it’s various stages

ADMIN EDIT: Thank you Simsy!

resources     blood loss     submission     

Writing Realistic Injuries

This website will help you write realistic injuries.. thought this might be useful for everyone ( I know it will be for me)

ADMIN EDIT: Thanks for the submission, Simsy! It will definitely come in useful.

resources     injuries     submission     

10 Minute Mail

Found this very useful website for creating temporary emails so you do not have to waste time signing up for gmails or hotmails etc. Once you click on the link, it creates a temporary email for you which only lasts for 10 minutes! It’s pretty useful and there’s even a link where you can opt for a longer time. Have fun!

3 notes      09.05.14
resources     10 minute mail